2 thoughts on “

  1. Smart Cities Seen as Major Driver of ICT Innovation for the Next Three Decades

    To encourage a thriving culture, cities must attain economic, social, and environmental sustainability

    Global metropolitan areas are facing unprecedented challenges as the pace of urbanization is increasing at a pace that is testing the ability of city planners to meet the current and anticipated needs of its citizens. Each day, more than 150 thousand people get added in urban areas. Additionally, with climate change and other environmental pressures, cities are increasingly needed to be “Smart” and take significant actions to meet stringent targets inflicted by commitments and legal obligations.

    Moreover, the enhanced mobility of our societies has created extreme competition between cities to attract skilled residents, corporate presence and related jobs. To encourage a thriving culture, cities must attain economic, social, and environmental sustainability. This can be made possible by improving a city’s efficiency, which needs to leverage a variety of disparate infrastructure and services. Despite the fact that the availability of smart solutions for cities has grown quickly, the transformation will only happen with the realization of radical changes in the way cities function today.

    In theory, developing Smart Cities is a simple process in which solution providers provide infrastructure and technologies and city authorities acquire them and integrate them. The reality is much different as developing a Smart City represents an ongoing transformation process in which the correct environment for smart solutions to be efficiently accepted takes shape over a period of decades. The development of a Smart City also needs participation, input, ideas and expertise from a large number of stakeholders, not the least of which is the citizenry. (Source: http://telecomengine.com, May 16, 2015)

    The Strateq Team wholeheartedly concurs with this analysis form TelecomEngine. However, will ICT infrastructure and technologies be enough? Indeed, what about the organizational and social innovation that is also needed to integrate the input from that large number of stakeholders, not the least of which is the citizenry? At Strateq we are working on answers to these questions. ICT is not enough.

  2. Our next workshop on our project in North Carolina on Smart and Connected Communities will be held coming April 5th, at Epic in Charlotte. Participants on our discussion on Living Lab exploration will be smart cities and rural communities from NC, universities, business and research institutes. Our aim is bridging the gap between smart cities and rural communities.

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